Tag Archives: Education

Chris Wild – Getting Further with Data Analysis Faster and Easier

In September 2015 Professor Chris Wild from the Department of Statistics at the
University of Auckland, New Zealand, gave a PedRIO (Pedagogic Research Institute and Observatory at the University of Plymouth) talk at Plymouth University entitled Getting Further with Data Analysis Faster and Easier.

Chris talked about his recent work with Future Learn developing a MOOC for the University of Auckland. The Future Learn platform and the introductory statistics course entitled ‘Data to Insight’ has been mentioned here before.

In addition, and the main focus of the presentation, Chris talks about the use of software to teach statistics faster and easier, using examples from iNZight, the data analysis software, to demonstrate thisinzight_transp.

The talk was very well attended and included academic staff from across the University. We would like to thank Chris for his presentation and all those who attended and made the event what it was, as well as PedRio for hosting the talk.

Chris was keen to collaborate with others on new and existing projects so please visit his site and email him should you have any further comments or questions.

Notes

The video covers the first 40 minuets of the presentation. Video clips from the MOOC, that are now freely available online (check the previous blog post), have been removed to shorten the video.  A further half hour has also been removed, this included an extended live demo of the iNZight software that was not clear enough to view in the video.

This video is a .MOV and may take a while to download.

Don’t Panic – How to End Poverty in 15 Years

Tomorrow night on BBC TWO (UK) Statistician Professor Hans Rosling is back with more amazing visualisations, showing the world how we can end poverty. This is part of the BBC’s This World series, find out more using the link below.

Professor Rosling is an excellent communicator and educator who likes to let data do the talking with some exceptional data visualisations. Watch the programme live on the 23rd September (8:00pm, BBC TWO) or catch it on the iPlayer (UK) afterward.

Many of you will be familiar with the GapMinder project and the previous programme shown on the BBC to feature Professor Rosling entitled The Joy of Stats, this appears to now be available, in full, on YouTube.

Teaching Statistics Summer 2015 – Volume 37 – Number 2

The latest edition of the Wiley Teaching Statistics Journal is out (Summer 2015 – Vol 37) and as usual it contains some nice original articles including probability activities that Primary teachers may find of interest.Cover to TSJ Volume 37 - Summer 2015

One article that is especially insightful takes a look at the topic of teaching statistics for non-statisticians, that is students of subjects other than statistics being taught statistics. In the  article the focus is on economics and humanities students taking elementary / introductory statistics classes.

Richard Hindls and Stanislava Hronová from the Department of Economic Statistics at the University of Economics in Prague focus on some of the problems that can, ‘weaken the interest in statistics or lead to false use of statistic methods‘.

Possibly the proposition put forward, and the conclusions provided, will not be new to anyone involved in statistical education but for those teaching statistics to non-statisticians, especially teachers who are non-statisticians themselves, the article could be a real eye-opener.

You should be able to access the article here. For general journal enquirers or to subscribe you should contact Wiley.

Wiley Teaching Statistics Journal

Spurious Correlations

A recent tweet mentioned the great Spurious Correlations website created by Tyler Vigen. Tyler’s site has been featured in numerous news articles and often gets a mention when one spurious correlation or another appears in the media. It is just a bit of fun but has a serious message, reinforcing the adage that ‘Correlation does not imply causation’.

So, in case you have not come across Tyler’s site already, the BBC produced an online article  that may prove a good introduction and possibly make up part of a lesson on Correlation.

In addition, the site has been featured on the always excellent BBC Radio ‘More or Less’ programme (International visitors may not be able to access this).

All the links are below:

Spurious Correlations
BBC Magazine
BBC Radio ‘More or Less’