Tag Archives: Stats

School Resources

Occasionally a resource will pop-up that may prove useful in a stats lesson. Here are links to two…one old, one new.

The first is from Sir David Spiegelhalter, who is Winton Professor of the Public Understanding of Risk at the University of Cambridge. you can find it on his blog Understanding Uncertainty.

It is an interactive version of the famous Florence Nightingale Coxcombs, the originals being produced by Nightingale sometime after the Crimean War (1853-1856). There are links here to other related resources making this a fantastic cross-curricular activity. The resource itself is in Adobe Flash.

The second is a game stumbled upon on Twitter. Created by Omar Wagih a Bioinformatics PhD student, who you can tweet @omarwagih. The game called guessthecorrelation.com produces a series of scatter plots and asks participants to guess the correlation between two variables.

I am sure you can think of lots of ways the game can be incorporated into a stats lesson. It might also be fun  to combine it with a discussion of correlation more generally. This could include a link to Spurious Correlation (featured here before) that now has a spurious correlation discovery tool.

Winton Infographic Competition

The Winton Infographic Competition, open to UK schools, has now closed. However, we decided to allow late entries to give teachers time to submit their class/team entries. All entries have to be emailed to us and that can take time to organise.Winton Logo

If you have taken part and have yet to submit your entries please do so via email (icse@plymouth.ac.uk) as soon as possible. Judging takes place in the next couple of weeks. You can find all the details for entry at CensusAtSchool.org.uk.

The competition provides an ideal opportunity to work with real data in a  creative way, requiring the use of ICT tools like Word and Excel to produce interesting data visualisations.

Chris Wild – Getting Further with Data Analysis Faster and Easier

In September 2015 Professor Chris Wild from the Department of Statistics at the
University of Auckland, New Zealand, gave a PedRIO (Pedagogic Research Institute and Observatory at the University of Plymouth) talk at Plymouth University entitled Getting Further with Data Analysis Faster and Easier.

Chris talked about his recent work with Future Learn developing a MOOC for the University of Auckland. The Future Learn platform and the introductory statistics course entitled ‘Data to Insight’ has been mentioned here before.

In addition, and the main focus of the presentation, Chris talks about the use of software to teach statistics faster and easier, using examples from iNZight, the data analysis software, to demonstrate thisinzight_transp.

The talk was very well attended and included academic staff from across the University. We would like to thank Chris for his presentation and all those who attended and made the event what it was, as well as PedRio for hosting the talk.

Chris was keen to collaborate with others on new and existing projects so please visit his site and email him should you have any further comments or questions.

Notes

The video covers the first 40 minuets of the presentation. Video clips from the MOOC, that are now freely available online (check the previous blog post), have been removed to shorten the video.  A further half hour has also been removed, this included an extended live demo of the iNZight software that was not clear enough to view in the video.

This video is a .MOV and may take a while to download.

Dr Michael A Posner – School Statistics Talk

Here is a link to the presentation (PowerPoint) by Dr Posner for his school STEM talk he gave recently here at Plymouth.

This is just the first half, the second half containing the activities has been removed as it would be difficult for someone to deliver these without supporting material. However if you are interested in finding out more please visit Dr Posner’s profile page at Villanova University.

The talk detailed Dr Posner’s personal journey to becoming AssociatArt_of_Stats_Talke Professor of Statistics in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Villanova University. It covered the STEM career opportunities for those studying statistics, the importance of data and some innovative uses of data. It also included some current trending topics such as Big Data and the rise of the Data Scientist.

 “For Today’s Graduate, Just One Word: Statistics”

- NYTimes (2009)

We would again like to thank Dr Posner for his time and of course the two local schools who brought their pupils along and made the event possible ( these were Plymouth High School for Girls and Stover School).

Talk_on_Statistics_Plymouth University_Jan2016

Unfortunately the sound recording from this session had far too much echo and wasn’t clear, if there is time in the future we will put up a transcript of the Q&A.

Dr Michael A. Posner – Propensity Score Analysis

Recently Dr Michael A. Posner, Associate Professor of Statistics, Villanova University, USA, visited Plymouth University.

Dr. Posner gave two talks during his visit the first of which is now available to view online. The talk held on the 20th of January 2016 was entitled ‘Making Valid Inferences in Observational Studies using Propensity Score Analysis’, you can read the full abstract by downloading the leaflet for the day, linked below.

Making Valid Inferences in Observational Studies using Propensity Score Analysis

We would like to thank Michael for his visit and talk, we have had wonderful comments from attendees to both talks and have had many requests externally for links to the presentation. Incidentally, if you would rather view just the slides you can view Michael’s profile and previous talks on his profile page, linked to above and in the leaflet.

We would like to thank PedRIO (Pedagogic Research Institute and Observatory at the University of Plymouth) who supported the event and of course all those who attended, we had a great turnout with a wide cross section of academic staff from across the University.

Notes

The audience audio for the questions and answers segment was not totally clear so these are part of a separate video.

These videos are .MOV and large and may take a while to download.

There are more videos from other talks to follow, once these are done they will all be added to our resource page.

 

School Event – Plymouth University

Following our news last week that Dr Michael A Posner will be visiting Plymouth to give a PedRio talk we can now announce that Dr Posner will also be giving a talk for local schools while he is in Plymouth.

Dr. Posner is an Associate Professor of Statistics, Villanova University, and director of the Center for Statistical Education (USA), he is currently on sabbatical at The Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics Centre for Mathematical Sciences at the University of Cambridge.

The school event will be held at Plymouth University (on the main campus) on the 21st of January from 10:00 until 11:30, and is for Y10-Y12 and beyond. Entitled “Statistics – The Art and Science of Making Decisions with Data” the event will include a short informal talk with questions and answers and then an activity, this event would be ideal for students looking to begin a career in STEM

If you would like some of your students to attend, or require further details, please contact us as soon as possible via email at icse@plymouth.ac.uk, you can download more information here.

WinAtSchool Final 2015

Winton LogoThe WinAtSchool 2015 final is almost here. The competition, organised by the ICSE with Plymouth University, and sponsored by Winton Capital Management, is to take place at at the University of Reading, Whiteknight campus on the 1st July 2015.

We would like to congratulate the twelve finalist schools that will be competing in the final. The schools are as follows:

Bourne Grammar School, Lincolnshire
Colyton Grammar School, Devon
Dame Alice Owen’s School, Hertfordshire
Devonport High School for Boys, Devon
Kendrick School, Berkshire
Kesteven and Grantham Girls’ School, Lincolnshire
Malmesbury School, Wiltshire
Marling School, Gloucestershire
Saint Olave’s Grammar School, Kent
Sale Grammar School, Cheshire
The Blue Coat School, Liverpool, Merseyside
Warwick School, Warwickshire

It is shaping up to be an exciting finale with more than one team having been at the final last year including Marling School, the defending champions.

For the uninitiated, the grand final will consist of a team of four pupils from each school competing to win a top prize of £2,500. This year the event will be hosted by Dr Vicky Neale, Whitehead Lecturer at the Mathematical Institute and Balliol College at the University of Oxford, while Neil Sheldon, the Royal Statistical Society’s vice president for education and statistical literacy, will present the prizes.

We would like to thank all the teachers and pupils who took part, as usual the standard has been very high. For more information and the full press release visit #WinAtSchool.

Marling School

 

 

 

 

Pictured: 2014 Winners – Marling School, receiving their prize from Professor David Hand (L) and Neil Sheldon (R).

Data to Insight – Videos

Some of you may recall back in October 2014 a post on this blog about FutureLearn (@FutureLearn) running an introductory statistics course, entitled “Data to Insight“, developed by the University of Auckland. You can check the post here.

Now the lead academic from the course, Professor Chris Wild, has made all of the video material from the MOOC freely available. You can peruse the course index from his home page at the University of Auckland (stat.auckland.ac.nz) and view all the videos on his YouTube channel.

There is no question that outside of the MOOC framework this will be a tough introduction to statistics without some prior knowledge or a tutor to guide you but it would certainly complement exiting study or self-study for those willing to give it a go.

You can comment on all the videos via YouTube.

Teaching Statistics Summer 2015 – Volume 37 – Number 2

The latest edition of the Wiley Teaching Statistics Journal is out (Summer 2015 – Vol 37) and as usual it contains some nice original articles including probability activities that Primary teachers may find of interest.Cover to TSJ Volume 37 - Summer 2015

One article that is especially insightful takes a look at the topic of teaching statistics for non-statisticians, that is students of subjects other than statistics being taught statistics. In the  article the focus is on economics and humanities students taking elementary / introductory statistics classes.

Richard Hindls and Stanislava Hronová from the Department of Economic Statistics at the University of Economics in Prague focus on some of the problems that can, ‘weaken the interest in statistics or lead to false use of statistic methods‘.

Possibly the proposition put forward, and the conclusions provided, will not be new to anyone involved in statistical education but for those teaching statistics to non-statisticians, especially teachers who are non-statisticians themselves, the article could be a real eye-opener.

You should be able to access the article here. For general journal enquirers or to subscribe you should contact Wiley.

Wiley Teaching Statistics Journal

ELSEVIER – Supporting Mathematical Sciences

As part of a project supported by ElseVier to promote mathematical sciences we have produced a statistical audit survey that researchers can use to obtain a profile of their knowledge, awareness and skills in Elsevier and Plymouth University Logostatistics and data handling that may help to formulate a personal development and training programme for these skills.

The audit, in the form of a survey that can be taken online or as an MS Word document that can be downloaded, can be found using the link below.

You can opt to save and print your results or email them to yourself if you provide an address, we recommend printing your results. If you do provide your email please be assured it is only used to return your responses, if you have any concerns please view our data protection policy for clarity.

Any postgraduates who uses statistics within their work will find the audit a useful means of assessing their skills and knowledge of the discipline.

Take the Audit