Tag Archives: Stats

Events in March

Below you can find further information on two very different, but not too so, events in March that look too good to miss, both are linked to a book. The first is ‘The Improbability Principle Why Coincidences Miracles and Rare Events Happen Every Day‘ on the 11th of March at Imperial College London at the South Kensington Campus the second is ‘Transitions in Undergraduate Mathematics Education‘ at the University of Birmingham at the Edgbaston Campus on the 25th of March.

The Improbability Principle Why Coincidences Miracles and Rare Events Happen Every Day (David Hand) – 11th March 16:00-17:30 Imperial College London

Transitions in Undergraduate Mathematics Education: Staff Development Event – 25th March 12:00-16:30 University of Birmingham

 

Double-Yolk Eggs

We don’t normally post school based maths and stats resources directly on the ICSE site, for them you should hop along to CensusAtSchool.org.uk, but over the weekend I re-discovered a news story and NCETM resource on the probability of double-yolk eggs, after finding a double-yolk myself at breakfast sparked the memory.

An original UK news story featured in the Mail, google it if that link is outdated. You can then view the excellent NCETM resource (as a PDF) from their website (link below).

NCETM – What is the chance of getting a double-yolk egg?

The resource takes information from Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter’s blog, again you can google this if the link is outdated. The explanation also featured on the BBC Radio 4 programme More or Less, that if you do not follow you really should. The explanation would be an excellent followup to the lesson itself.

 

Increase Your Chances of Getting a Graduate Job

It was interesting to see this post on the ASA (American Statistical Association) This is Statistics site that hints at a big demand for statisticians in the future.

It goes on to say that careers in statistics will grow much faster within the predicted period (2012-2022) than any other occupation and that earnings will remain high. The prediction is via the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics but recent stories in the UK, would tend to indicate the same is true here.

The article ends with a call to educators to share this information with students as far and as wide as possible.

So…don’t go nudging your students into becoming Mathematical Physicists, as valuable a career choice as that is, put them on to a career in statistics instead, they will thank you for it in the future when they walk straight into that graduate job.

 

World Stats Quiz

WOS LogoThe World Stats Quiz launched in 2013 as part of The World of Statistics, has now moved and can be found right here on the ICSE site.

Produced by Plymouth University in cooperation with the International CensusAtSchool Project the quiz now has thousands of responses.

You are welcome to take part and can access the quiz here.

Why not visit the World of Statistics website for news and resources.

Statistical Modeller – Plymouth UK

Plymouth University in cooperation with Intelligent Optimisations (@iopowertolearn) is advertising a vacancy for a Statistical Modeller, this role will involve collaboration with Plymouth University and the successful candidate would be required to liaise with researchers in the School of Computing and Mathematics on a regular basis.

You can find all the details at StatsJobs.com, the post closes on the 14th of December.

 

 

 

 

 

WinAtSchool – Goes Mobile

WinAtSchool is an online competition, in statistics and mathematics for Year 7 to 11 pupils in England and Wales; P7 to S4  in Scotland; and Year 8 to 12 in Northern Ireland. The competition is fun and easy to enter, with prizes for winning schools. You can find out more by visiting the site at WinAtSchool.org.uk.

FIRST PRIZE: £2,500
SECOND PRIZE: £1,000
THIRD PRIZE: £500

Both the Practice Quiz and Prize Competition are now open and, from today, available on mobile devices that have JavaScript enabled. A link to the practice quiz is provided on the button below.

If you are not based in a UK school but would like to have a go you may use the LEA code ‘100‘ and the School code ‘9999‘, just be sure to spread the word and tell a Maths teacher.

Tablet_Practice

Spurious Correlations

A recent tweet mentioned the great Spurious Correlations website created by Tyler Vigen. Tyler’s site has been featured in numerous news articles and often gets a mention when one spurious correlation or another appears in the media. It is just a bit of fun but has a serious message, reinforcing the adage that ‘Correlation does not imply causation’.

So, in case you have not come across Tyler’s site already, the BBC produced an online article  that may prove a good introduction and possibly make up part of a lesson on Correlation.

In addition, the site has been featured on the always excellent BBC Radio ‘More or Less’ programme (International visitors may not be able to access this).

All the links are below:

Spurious Correlations
BBC Magazine
BBC Radio ‘More or Less’

 

 

Core Maths

There is already a great deal of information out there for Core Maths (UK), with practitioners having started this September (2014), but if you are yet to get involved with the new “Core Maths” qualification here is a brief synopsis from the Telegraph, including some sample questions for you to have a go at: www.telegraph.co.uk

To the real reason for the post…MEI (Mathematics in Education and Industry) have two upcoming online seminars dedicated to Core Maths. Details follow below but for the full scheduled take a look using the link here.

Thursday 27 November 17:00
General Introduction to Core Maths qualifications

Friday 5 December 16:00
OCR(MEI) Quantitative Reasoning and Quantitative Problem Solving

CensusAtSchool 2014/2015 Questionnaire Live

The ICSE this week launches the 2014-2015 CensusAtSchool Questionnaire. If you are a teacher based in the UK why not take advantage of the free lesson plans and resources to help improve mathematics, statistics and data handling in your school.

Getting Started

Want to try it out before you use the resource with your class? Follow these simple steps:

Want to know more…read on.

What is CensusAtSchool

Initially, when conceived in 1999 CensusAtSchool was run in cooperation with the Office for National Statistics (ONS) which is responsible for the adult census. The aim was for each school class to be used as an illustrative population for a census. The same principles apply to the class as to the general population. As they were collected, data was added to a national database.

CensusAtSchool now produces a new survey every year for school aged learners to complete, that contains between 10 and 20 questions divided into categories – about the children themselves, their households and their schools. The distribution of questionnaires, the receipt of summary spreadsheets of the returns, cross-curricular worksheets for use in the classroom and the national database of pupils’ responses are all administered online.

It’s all about data handling

CensusAtSchool provides the opportunity to collect real data that excites an individual to investigate and enquire further, this is especially true when it is personal data that brings to life a story one has a personal connection with. Every academic year a new online survey is produced for 11-16 year old children that allows them to collect their real data via some core questions and a series of topical or themed questions.

The planning and collection of data by pupils has obvious long-lasting effects, multiple subjects are incorporated and topic boundaries crossed while integrating ICT and data handling that has real benefits throughout many curriculum activities, this is amplified further when data is analysed, discussed and disseminated.

You can visit the site at CensusAtSchool.org.uk. Did we mention we have internationalpartners running the project in New Zealand, the USA, Ireland, Korea and Japan? Take a look here.

Plymouth SciTech Showcase

This week saw the ICSE taking part in the Plymouth University #SciTech Showcase 2014.

The activity day provides an opportunity for school aged learners to visit the campus and see the technical innovation taking place at the university and the sort of career paths that are possible for future graduates.

Giant bubbles, Origami, Puzzles, Computer Security, Computer Games, Robots all on show at #SciTech 2014.

This event included everything from chemistry experiments and dinosaurs to computer games and robots. Maths and Stats were represented by our colleagues from the School of Computing and Mathematics, with their #MathBubble, Code Breaking and some impressive origami, while we provided a sample of our #WinAtSchool competition using an Audience Response System.

We would like to thank all the student ambassadors who helped out with the #WinAtSchool quiz and the PGCSE students from the Institute of Education who ably demonstrated their paper folding skills.

The #WinAtSchool Maths and Stats Quiz Competition for schools goes live on the 3rd of November, visit the website for more information winatschool.org.uk.

Showcase site